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Movie History

               Movie History Film Clips

Samuel Goldwyn, Producer (Coronet Magazine, 1944)

Screen writer Sidney Carroll (1913 - 1988) penned this Samuel Goldwyn (1879 1974) profile at a time when both men had productive futures before them (the former, far more than the latter) but Carroll concluded his article believing that in the future the famed producer and Hollywood founding father would be remembered primarily for his movies rather than his famous contradictory misstatements (known as "Goldwynisms"). Well, note to Carroll: we're now well into the Twenty-First Century and the term Goldwynism is still with us. But this is not the subject of this article (only one page); Carroll put to paper a serious column about the productive life of Goldwyn and all that he had accomplished since he co-founded Hollywood (along with Cecil B. De Mille) in 1913:

"He has done many remarkable things in 30 years. He has made as many stars as any man in the business; he was the first to make feature-length films; he was the first to bring the great writers to Hollywood... Goldwyn is the greatest maker of motion pictures ever to come out of Hollywood [with the exception of The Goldwyn Follies (1938)].


Humphrey Bogart and his Feud with the Hollywood Press (Pageant Magazine, 1956)

"There was a time, Humphrey Bogart maintains, when he saw all interviewers and tried to answer all questions put to him..."

"But I can't take it anymore, I've had to cut the fan magazines off my list entirely. Just the sheer smell of them drives me crazy. They smell of milk. The interviewers themselves treat you like a two-year-old child with their will-Debbie-marry-Eddie and can-Lance-Fuller-live-without-a-wife kind of idiocy. You know the whole sorry groove of the thing."

It was no wonder that in 1949 the Hollywood Women's Press Club awarded Bogie their highly uncoveted Sour Apple Award for his crass treatment of the press. In the not too distant future the Hollywood press corps would grow to love one Hollywood star who gave them 100 percent access and was always cheerful: William Holden; click here to read that article..


Boy-Meets-Girl at Breakneck Speed (Quick Magazine, 1951)

To the highly ripped, bronzed-love gods who toil away at, this article didn't seem peculiar in the least - but to your average magazine-reader in 1951 it must have been quite racey. It concerned the brisk pace at which Hollywood's leading men were able to get to first base in their respective movies; the prudish editors at QUICK MAGAZINE (note the name) actually brought a stop-watch into the theater.

In the contest between Burt Lancaster (seen on the left) and Robert Mitchum, Burt was the clear winner: clocking in at 30 seconds).


Lana Turner (Quick Magazine, 1949)

When this Hollywood profile first appeared on paper, actress Lana Turner (1921 1995) was all of twenty-nine years of age and about to begin working on A Life of Her Own, it was her thirtieth movie; her last four films had nearly grossed a record-breaking $20 million, and her smiling mug was on each and every Hollywood fan magazine that could be found.

"Today, the sleek, gray-eyed Lana has shed the plumpness of two years ago, keeps her weight between to 118 and 127 lbs... Now Lana is as shapely as she was in those early days. She has the 'perfect' figure: 5 ft. 3 in., 34-in. bust, 24-in. waist, 34.5 in. hips."

The article is illustrated with photographs from eight of her pre-'49 movies and lists all the husbands that she'd collected up to that same period (she had acquired eight husbands before she was through).


Shirley MacLaine at 22 (Modern Screen, 1956)

Arriving in Hollywood by way of "The Trouble with Harry" in 1955, and cute as buttons - Shirley MacLaine (b. 1934) was the adopted "little sister" of the Rat Pack, that odd movie star whose sensitive skin burned too easily in the California sun and one of the few starlets who was actually capable of sewing her own clothes.


Clark Gable: Cad (Confidential Magazine, 1955)

We all know that there are two sides to every story, but not in this article. If the utterances of Clark Gable's first wife (Josephine Dillon, 1884 - 1971) are true, then we have no choice but to believe that Gable was a real stinker.
We like to think that he was a wee bit nicer to his four other wives.


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