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"The average American town on D-Day reflected the restrained spirit of a quiet Sunday... With uncanny oneness of gesture, America turned to prayer... Attendance at Catholic churches rose more than 50 percent; special Protestant and Jewish services were thronged by an unceasing succession of worshipers. Many were women - middle-aged matrons whose ample bosoms bore service pins, war workers wearing slacks and carrying lunch boxes and girls in light summer dresses, their young heads decked with handkerchiefs. There were those who felt no need for church: the girl who fell to her knees at a busy Detroit intersection; the Covington, Kentucky women who sat in busses reciting their rosaries; the Coffeyville, Kansas, families, still in night attire, who knelt on their front porches; prison inmates, servicemen at domestic camps and hospitalized veterans of Tunisia and Salerno. In Corpus Christi, Texas, the parents of 50 servicemen crawled two blocks on their hands and knees in D-day penance; en route from Washington to New York, a clergyman led train passengers in an impromptu service."

Click here to read about D-Day...

Click here to learn more about the American W.W. II home front...

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D-Day On The Home Front (Newsweek Magazine, 1944)

D-Day On The Home Front (Newsweek Magazine, 1944)

D-Day On The Home Front (Newsweek Magazine, 1944)

D-Day On The Home Front (Newsweek Magazine, 1944)

D-Day On The Home Front (Newsweek Magazine, 1944)

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