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"As a result of persistent agitation and demands for inquiries as to the alleged needless sacrifice of American lives up to the hour when the Armistice was to go into effect, the last day of the World War is still one of the great controversial points of history."

The author of this piece, Arthur E. Hartzell - formerly an information officer attached to the Second Army's General Staff (who writes with all the flair associated with that office) erroneously states that American losses on that day were a mere 150 men. The Army records indicate otherwise: 268 men were killed, 2,769 were severely wounded, 466 were slightly wounded and 198 were gassed in varying degrees.

- from Amazon:

     


The Armistice Day Offensive (The Home Sector, 1920)

The Armistice Day Offensive (The Home Sector, 1920)

The Armistice Day Offensive (The Home Sector, 1920)

The Armistice Day Offensive (The Home Sector, 1920)

The Armistice Day Offensive (The Home Sector, 1920)

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