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Five color photographs of the Japanese-American internment camp at Manzanar, California helped to illustrate the attached 1942 COLLIER'S MAGAZINE article by Jim Marshall on what Manzanar was and was not, who was there and how it operated:

"In the past few months a dozen new war-born communities have risen almost magically in the open spaces of the Far West...Altogether, their population is about 115,000, but only a few hundred of theses are [for] Whites. The others are Japanese and Americans of Japanese ancestry. Although peopled and largely operated by members of an Asian race, these communities are as American as San Francisco or Topeka. They hold elections, have traffic problems, go to the movies, read newspapers, stage fund drives and proceed with life as much as any other town."

"Well, the boys and girls will tell you they're all a little bewildered, but they're making the best of it. The war can't last forever and when it's over maybe the Issei and the Nisei and the Sansei can go back to their old homes and live normal lives again."

A similar article from the same year can be read here...

Click here to read more articles about the Japanese-American internment...

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''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

''The Problem People'' (Collier's Magazine, 1942)

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