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All the columnists quoted in the attached article agreed that President Roosevelt was the first chief executive to ever have faced such a genuine economic disaster as that which had descended upon the United States in 1929:

"Look at the picture flung into the face of Franklin Roosevelt:"

"Ships are tied up in harbors and their hulls are rotting; freight trains are idle; passenger trains are empty; 11,000,000 people are without work; business is at a standstill; the treasury building is bursting with gold, yet Congress wrestles with a deficit mounting into the billions, the result of wild and extravagant spending; granaries are overflowing with wheat and corn; cotton is a drag on the market, food crops are gigantic and unsalable, yet millions beg for food; mines are shut down; oil industries are engaged in cutthroat competition; farmers are desperate, taking the law into their own hands to prevent foreclosures; factories are idle; industry is paralyzed; 200,000 to 300,000 beardless boys are drifting aimlessly along the highways; an active smokestack is a curiosity."

Click here to read an editorial about FDR's spending policies.

CLICK HERE to read additional primary source articles about the Great Depression...

Read about the Great Depression and the U.S. auto industry...

Click here to read about the manner in which the Hoover administration addressed the Great Depression.

From Amazon:

From Amazon: The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression

     


- from Amazon:


FDR Takes On the Great Depression (The Literary Digest, 1933)

FDR Takes On the Great Depression (The Literary Digest, 1933)

FDR Takes On the Great Depression (The Literary Digest, 1933)

FDR Takes On the Great Depression (The Literary Digest, 1933)

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