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A magazine interview highlighting the tennis career of Suzanne Lenglen (1899 1938) up to the summer of 1921.

Mille. Lenglen was a remarkable French tennis player who won 31 Grand Slam titles from 1914 through 1926. She is remembered as the the first European, high-profile woman tennis star to go professional: in 1912 she was paid $50,000.00 to play a series of matches against Mary K. Browne (1891 - 1971). This article concentrates on her supreme confidence and overwhelming determination to win.

"When prest as to whether she liked a tonic, or say just a little wine, before her matches, Mile. Lenglen admitted that she did and that she had been promised that it would be obtained for her in the United States. Despite the fact that she is in an arid land Suzanne praised the effect of this stimulant on her game."
"'Nothing," she said, "is so fine for the nerve, for the strength, for the morale. A little wine tones up the system just right. One can not always be serious. There must be some sparkle, too.'"

     


An Interview with Suzanne Lenglen (Literary Digest, 1921)

An Interview with Suzanne Lenglen (Literary Digest, 1921)

An Interview with Suzanne Lenglen (Literary Digest, 1921)

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