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After the Wall Street Crash of 1929 it was generally recognized by the red-meat-eaters on Madison Avenue that the rules of the ad game had been re-written. There were far fewer dollars around than there were during the good ol' Twenties, and what little cash remained seldom changed addresses with the same devil-may-care sense of abandon that it used to. Yet as bleak as the commercial landscape was in 1932, those hardy corner-office boys, those executives with the gray flannel ulcers remembered that they were in the optimism business and if there was a way to turn it around, they would find it.

CLICK HERE to read about advertising in the United States during the Second World War.

     


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Ad Man: Heal Thyself... (Pathfinder Magazine, 1932)

Ad Man: Heal Thyself... (Pathfinder Magazine, 1932)

Ad Man: Heal Thyself... (Pathfinder Magazine, 1932)

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