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Larry Parks (1914 1975) was an American movie actor. His career arched from bit player and supporting roles to top billing before his career was virtually ended when he admitted to having once been a member of a Communist party cell, which led to his blacklisting by all Hollywood studios. His best known role was as Al Jolson, whom he portrayed in two films, The Jolson Story (1946), and Jolson Sings Again (1949).

In 1951 Parks was summoned to appear before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, under threat of being blacklisted in the movie industry, but he begged not to be forced to testify. He eventually did so in tears, only to be blacklisted anyway. Larry Parks eventually gave up the names of his former colleagues and submitted to the wishes of the House Un-American Activities Committee. Following his admission before the committee, Columbia Pictures dropped him, and a romantic comedy he made for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer was shelved for three years. Parks made only a few more films after that, but continued to squeeze out a living acting on the stage and doing occasional television programs. (Wikipedia)

     


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A Hollywood Star Before the Committee (Pathfinder Magazine, 1951)

A Hollywood Star Before the Committee (Pathfinder Magazine, 1951)

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