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You can bet that throughout the short career of Marilyn Monroe there were voluminous amounts stylistes, cosmetologists, coiffeurs and doyennes of glamour who came in contact with the headliner at one time or another. Some offered genuine nuggets of beauty wisdom while others could only offer bum steers. Although the name "Emmeline Snively" may sounds like a character from a Charles Dickens novel, she was in actuality the very first woman to offer sound fashion advice to the ingenue - advice that would start her on her path to an unparalleled celebrity status as the preeminent "Blonde Bombshell" in all of Hollywood. You see, Emmeline Snively was the one who recommended that La Monroe dye her hair blonde in the first place. Mrs. Snively had a number memories of the young Marilyn that make this an interesting read. She recalls that when she met Marilyn, she had no interest in show business outside of being an extra. She remembered that the future sex-symbol admitted to having little interest in clothing, and it showed.

     


The Woman Who Created Marilyn Monroe (People Today Magazine, 1954)

The Woman Who Created Marilyn Monroe (People Today Magazine, 1954)

The Woman Who Created Marilyn Monroe (People Today Magazine, 1954)

The Woman Who Created Marilyn Monroe (People Today Magazine, 1954)

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