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The magazine article to the right concerns one of the great Canadian disappointments of the immediate post-war years: the failure to build the Canadian war memorial building. By the summer of 1919 1,000 paintings and drawings depicting the experiences of the World War had been amassed with the intention of displaying them in a museum which was to serve as a remembrance to the Canadian servicemen of that war. As this article makes clear, the works all the finest artists were to be viewed: Augustus John, A.J. Munnings, Sir William Orpen, Richard Jack, Charles Simms, Algernon Talmage, Bryan Shaw, Sir John Lavery and C.W. Nevinson. Throughout the Twenties and Thirties there were numerous committees charged with the task of launching the museum, but they were never able to agree on key issues; it took a second world war for the urgency of the project to take root - and, finally, the Canadian War Museum was officially established in 1942. The building designated to hold the art collection and military artifacts was dedicated in 1967.

Their official website can seen by clicking HERE.

     



W.W. I Art and the Canadian War Memorial (Vanity Fair Magazine, 1919)

W.W. I Art and the Canadian War Memorial (Vanity Fair Magazine, 1919)

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