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The First World War had only been raging for six months when this article first appeared in a 1915 issue of THE NEW REPUBLIC. As the journalist makes clear, one did not have to have an advanced degree in history to recognize that this war was unique; it involved almost every wealthy, industrialized European nation and their far-flung colonies; thousands of men were killed daily and many more thousands stepped forward to take their places. The writer recognized that this long anticipated war was an epic event and that, like the French Revolution, it would be seen by future generations as a marker which indicated that all changes began at that point:

"Those who were but a few months ago assuring us that there never could be another general war are most vociferously informing the same audience that this will be the last."

Click here to read about the W.W. I efforts of Prince Edward, the future Duke of Windsor.

     


1914: The Close of an Epoch (The New Republic, 1915)

1914: The Close of an Epoch (The New Republic, 1915)

1914: The Close of an Epoch (The New Republic, 1915)

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