Vanity Fair Magazine Articles
The Atlantic Monthly Articles
The Outlook Articles
People Today Articles
American Legion Monthly Articles
Sea Power Magazine Articles
Confederate Veteran Magazine Articles
flapper magazine Articles
La Baionnette Articles
PIC Magazine Articles
Outing Magazine Articles
Stage Magazine Articles
Life Magazine  Articles
National Park Service Histories Articles
Punch Magazine Articles
Men's Wear Articles
Current Literature Articles
The New York Times Articles
Hearst's Sunday American Articles
Click Magazine Articles
Creative Art Magazine Articles
Rob Wagner's Script Articles
The New Republic Articles
American Legion Weekly Articles
The Smart Set Articles
Photoplay Magazine Articles
Leslie's Magazine Articles
Ken Magazine Articles
PM  Articles
Saturday Review of Literature Articles
The Dial Magazine Articles
Theatre Arts Magazine Articles
The North American Review Articles
Direction Magazine Articles
'47 Magazine Articles
Film Spectator Articles
Film Daily Articles
Trench Warfare History Articles

 




Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

One year after Mary Jo Kopechne met her end, "only the principal players and a handful of off-stage character actors know what really happened that moonless midnight at Dike Bridge when Kennedy's 1967 Oldsmobile 88 sedan shot off a 20 year-old wooden bridge and flipped upside down into Poucha Pond. As the whole world knows, the accident was the aftermath of a beach party the night of July 18, 1969, attended by the senator, four of his cronies and six of the Kennedy 'boiler room girls'... The five [surviving] young women, who until Mary Jo's death, led cheerful, ordinary lives, appear to have been caught in an undertow of mysterious intrigue. Their utterances, once theirs to toss to the four winds, have been silenced by the almighty hand of somebody Down There."

As it was reported in this article, Mary Jo's mother, Gwen, repeatedly stated:

"[The] 'Boiler Room' gals did nothing to explain how her daughter ended up in Kennedy’s car."

“I’m angry at every one of those girls,” she said. “They should try to explain. Somebody is hiding something. I think all of them were shut up. I think there was a big cover-up and that everybody was paid off. The hearing, the inquest — it was all a farce. The Kennedys had the upper hand, and it’s been that way ever since!”

The attached article tracked the whereabouts of these five former campaign workers - wondering why haven't they said one word about the night their colleague died.

Read about the anticipated presidency of Robert Kennedy...

     



Chappaquiddick Cover-Up (Coronet Magazine, 1970)

Chappaquiddick Cover-Up (Coronet Magazine, 1970)

Chappaquiddick Cover-Up (Coronet Magazine, 1970)

Chappaquiddick Cover-Up (Coronet Magazine, 1970)

Chappaquiddick Cover-Up (Coronet Magazine, 1970)

Chappaquiddick Cover-Up (Coronet Magazine, 1970)

Chappaquiddick Cover-Up (Coronet Magazine, 1970)

Chappaquiddick Cover-Up (Coronet Magazine, 1970)

Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Copyright 2008 Old Magazine Articles