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This is an intriguing W.W. II story that was passed along by actor, announcer, producer and screenwriter John Nesbitt (1910 - 1960), who is best remembered as the narrator for the MGM radio series "Passing Parade", which concentrated on seldom remembered historic events and outright trivia. Five months after the end of the war, Nesbitt relayed to his audience that during the Battle of the Bulge, U.S.-born Nazi agents, having been ordered to kill General Eisenhower, did not even come close to fulfilling their mission, suffered incarceration among other humiliations - all due to a lack of knowledge where American comic strips were concerned. Read on...

-To read more 1940s articles about General Eisenhower, click here.

Click here to read about the disagreements between Generals Eisenhower and Montgomery

Here is another "Now it Can be Told" article...

The picture below depicts one of the many U.S.-born German soldiers who parachuted into the Bastogne region dressed as American military policemen as he is made ready for his execution.

     


The Plot to Assassinate Eisenhower Foiled by Cartoons...(Lion's Roar, 1946)

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