Vanity Fair Magazine Articles
The Atlantic Monthly Articles
The Outlook Articles
People Today Articles
American Legion Monthly Articles
Sea Power Magazine Articles
Confederate Veteran Magazine Articles
flapper magazine Articles
La Baionnette Articles
PIC Magazine Articles
Outing Magazine Articles
Stage Magazine Articles
Life Magazine  Articles
National Park Service Histories Articles
Punch Magazine Articles
Men's Wear Articles
Current Literature Articles
The New York Times Articles
Hearst's Sunday American Articles
Click Magazine Articles
Creative Art Magazine Articles
Rob Wagner's Script Articles
The New Republic Articles
American Legion Weekly Articles
The Smart Set Articles
Photoplay Magazine Articles
Leslie's Magazine Articles
Ken Magazine Articles
PM  Articles
Saturday Review of Literature Articles
The Dial Magazine Articles
Theatre Arts Magazine Articles
The North American Review Articles
Direction Magazine Articles
'47 Magazine Articles
Film Spectator Articles
Film Daily Articles
Trench Warfare History Articles

 




Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

"To those who have followed the political career of President Roosevelt, this unprecedented emphasis on public relations and publicity is no surprise. No president has ever been more alive to the potentialities of maintaining a 'good press', of gauging public reaction to his policies and of timing his announcements to obtain the widest and most sympathetic audience possible."

"The newspaper, radio, camera, news reel platform, and every other device known to modern publicity have provided the means for telling the New Deal story. The major daily newspapers are, of course, the first consideration, because they cast the die which editors in small towns and rural countries utilize to formulate editorial policy. But the New Deal is also reaching out directly to the small town and rural newspapers with 'clip sheets' for lazy editors, to the magazines with signed articles by big names in the Roosevelt Administration, and to the people generally through radio which reaches into the American home. The Government Printing Office has turned out more than 1,000,000 pieces of printed matter in the last twelve months, a new high in government publication production, much of it prepared for direct mailing to citizens in every section of the country. The story of the men behind the scenes who are directing and carrying out this huge peacetime publicity program is a revealing one. It is the story of the largest and most efficient staff of public relations men ever retained by government."

This article primarily concerns the 21 most effective publicists to have worked in FDR's first term.

More magazine articles about FDR can be read here...

     


- from Amazon:


FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

FDR's Publicity Machine (New Outlook Magazine, 1934)

Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2008 Old Magazine Articles