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Franz von Papen (1879 1969) was born into the German nobility; he worked as a diplomat, a politician and during the two World Wars he served as an intelligence officer. This article concerns the period in von Papen's life when, having been acquitted earlier by the international tribunal, he found himself once more in the docket:

"This time he faced a court of fellow countrymen... evidence against him was damaging. A fellow trusted lieutenant disputed von Papen's defense - claiming that as Vice Chancellor under Hitler he had worked for a more moderate form of Nazism."

"Oscar von Hindenburg, son of Hitler's predecessor as Reich president, Paul von Hindenburg, made an even more serious charge: He accused von Papen of inserting into his late father's will a paragraph giving Hindenburg's blessing to Hitler. This, he said, gave Hitler a new stature in the eyes of Germans."

We were fascinated to learn that the officers of the Nuremberg court had selected 250,000 people who were marked for trial; the court would be in session until 2047 had not an alternative plan been chosen.

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The Trial of Franz von Papen (Pathfinder Magazine, 1947)

The Trial of Franz von Papen (Pathfinder Magazine, 1947)

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