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A small notice from THE NATION marked the death of General John McCausland (1836 1927), C.S.A.. Much to the disappointment of the town elders residing in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, McCausland (pardoned by President U.S. Grant) escaped the hangman and outlived every last Confederate general ever put in the field.

"'Hardly a man is now alive who remembers that famous day and year' when a thrill of horror went through the North as the news came that a Confederate cavalry general, one John McCausland, had led his troops into Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, on the thirtieth of July, 1864, and burned the greater part of that town to the ground...He was declared an outlaw, a brigand, a violator of all the decencies of war and the laws thereof; a beast who warred on women and children."

     


Rebel General John McCausland: the Terror of  Chambersburg, Pennsylvania (The Nation, 1927)

Rebel General John McCausland: the Terror of  Chambersburg, Pennsylvania (The Nation, 1927)

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