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An article that answers some questions as to how the South was able to procure the necessary weapons needed to sustain their army:

"We began in April, 1861, without arsenal or laboratory, or powder mill of any capacity, and with no foundry or rolling mill except in Richmond...The Southerners were a 'gun-totting race, so that there were enough firearms for the first round of the struggle at Bull Run."

Lead at the rate 80,000 pounds a month came in from the mines near Wytheville, Virginia, to be smelted in the new government plant at Petersburg. Battlefields were combed for gun stocks, bores, and bullets with excellent results."

Click here to read more about the cannon works in Richmond.

Click here to read a 1862 review about the Civil War photographs of Mathew Brady.

Click here to read a similar article on this subject.

Click here to read about the Confederate conscription laws.

- A Lead Ball from Amazon

     


(Amazon)


How the Confederacy Armed Themselves  (Confederate Veteran, 1922)

How the Confederacy Armed Themselves  (Confederate Veteran, 1922)

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