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As early as 1920 the number of automobiles was quickly growing throughout the Western world and blacksmiths, like the fellow pictured above, were finding steady employment increasingly more difficult to secure. In this very brief column a journalist lays out how rapidly life was changing in the United States as a result of the "horseless carriage".

"The village smithy is no more. In the place of that interesting relic of a bygone day, there stands a substantial concrete building marked 'Garage'. This garage may not be all that we desire in the way of efficiency, honesty, courtesy or personnel, but it has become the most omnipresent and revolutionizing factor in our existence in the short space of twenty-five years."

Facts about American car ownership in the 1920s can be read here...

     


The Invention of the Car was Revolutionary (Vanity Fair Magazine, 1920)

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