Vanity Fair Magazine Articles
The Atlantic Monthly Articles
The Outlook Articles
People Today Articles
American Legion Monthly Articles
Sea Power Magazine Articles
Confederate Veteran Magazine Articles
flapper magazine Articles
La Baionnette Articles
PIC Magazine Articles
Outing Magazine Articles
Stage Magazine Articles
Life Magazine  Articles
National Park Service Histories Articles
Punch Magazine Articles
Men's Wear Articles
Current Literature Articles
The New York Times Articles
Hearst's Sunday American Articles
Click Magazine Articles
Creative Art Magazine Articles
Rob Wagner's Script Articles
The New Republic Articles
American Legion Weekly Articles
The Smart Set Articles
Photoplay Magazine Articles
Leslie's Magazine Articles
Ken Magazine Articles
PM  Articles
Saturday Review of Literature Articles
The Dial Magazine Articles
Theatre Arts Magazine Articles
The North American Review Articles
Direction Magazine Articles
'47 Magazine Articles
Film Spectator Articles
Film Daily Articles
Trench Warfare History Articles

 




Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

"The very first engagement of the conflict, when the North Koreans crushed South Korean defenses at the 38th parallel, demonstrated the superiority of the North Korean Army. On June 28, three days after the opening attack, a tank/infantry force leading the main North Korean thrust entered Seoul... In the face of the onslaught, the South Korean Army retreated, leaving most of its equipment behind. Whatever effectiveness it may have possessed was already lost."

Having found that all demands for a military withdrawal from the South were in vain, the United Nations Security Council convened on June 27 and requested that its member states form a military alliance and come to the aid of South Korea. President Truman committed U.S. Forces to the war that very day.

All told, Seoul would be taken and re-taken as many as four times before the war would end.

     


- from Amazon:


The Fall of Seoul (Dept. of the Army, 1956)

The Fall of Seoul (Dept. of the Army, 1956)

Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2008 Old Magazine Articles