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This article is a fine product of the Lindbergh-frenzy that rushed through tout-France during the summer of 1927 when the daring young pilot made his mad dash across the Atlantic Ocean. The writer implied that the Lindbergh-frenzy was so electrifying that it made the French sit up and reconsider the manner in which they educate their young:

"The American system of education which helped shape this heroic youth's character is the theme of an article by Raymond Gerard in 'L'Echo des Sports' of Paris, in which he says 'The marvelous exploit achieved by Charles Lindbergh was due to exceptional qualities of courage and cool judgment. But one can say also that it is a product of the advantages of American education....There is a world of difference between the shaping of minds in France and the preparation for life in America, French education is an affair of classes, of lessons, of studies, during which we pitchfork into the mind of the student the innumerable matters of school curriculum....American education is not like that'."

"The marvelous exploit achieved by Charles Lindbergh was due to exceptional qualities of courage and cool judgment. But one can say also that it is a product of the advantages of American education....There is a world of difference between the shaping of minds in France and the preparation for life in America, French education is an affair of classes, of lessons, of studies, during which we pitchfork into the mind of the student the innumerable matters of school curriculum....American education is not like that."

     


(Amazon)


Charles Lindbergh: Loved by the French (Literary Digest, 1927)

Charles Lindbergh: Loved by the French (Literary Digest, 1927)

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