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The Irish author, critic and dramatist, St. John Greer Ervine (1883 - 1971), believed that some of the dramatic characters populating the plays of George Bernard Shaw (1856 1950) were reoccurring characters who could be counted upon to appear again and again. He had a fine time illustrating this point and thinks nothing of stooping to compare Shaw with Shakespeare:

"Shakespeare primarily was interested in people. Mr. Shaw primarily is interested in doctrine..."

Thirty-five years later St. John Ervine would be awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his biography of George Bernard Shaw.

Click here to read various witty remarks by George Bernard Shaw.

       *Watch a 1943 Film Clip Depicting the Action-Packed Life-Style of a Librarian*


George Bernard Shaw and Literary Recycling (Vanity Fair, 1921)

George Bernard Shaw and Literary Recycling (Vanity Fair, 1921)

George Bernard Shaw and Literary Recycling (Vanity Fair, 1921)

George Bernard Shaw and Literary Recycling (Vanity Fair, 1921)

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