Vanity Fair Magazine Articles
Coronet Magazine Articles
Collier's Magazine Articles
Think Magazine Articles
YANK magazine Articles
Motion Picture Magazine Articles
Delineator Magazine Articles
The American Magazine Articles
Harper's Weekly Articles
OMNIBOOKs Magazine Articles
1950s Modern Screen Articles
Sir! Magazine Articles
The Masses  Articles
The Crises Magazine Articles
Popular Mechanics Articles
The Cornhill Magazine Articles
Times Literary Supplement Articles
Book League Monthly Articles
The Atlanta Georgian Articles
Click Magazine Articles
The Atlantic Monthly Articles
The Outlook Articles
People Today Articles
American Legion Monthly Articles
Sea Power Magazine Articles
Confederate Veteran Magazine Articles
flapper magazine Articles
La Baionnette Articles
PIC Magazine Articles
Outing Magazine Articles
Stage Magazine Articles
Life Magazine  Articles
National Park Service Histories Articles
Punch Magazine Articles
Men's Wear Articles
Current Literature Articles
The New York Times Articles
Hearst's Sunday American Articles

Have You Seen These Images?

 




Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

The Wall Street crash that took place in October of 1929 sparked a world-wide economic disaster that would linger for eleven years (give or take). The national suicide rate, which previously averaged 12.1 per 100,000 people in the decades prior to the Depression, jumped to an alarming 18.9 during the economic slump. The suicide rate remained higher than normal throughout the remainder of the Great Depression and was then drastically reduced when World War II began in Europe.

Despite the title of this article, very little column space is devoted to the growing number of suicides throughout the world. The article primarily concerns U.S. statistics, breaking down the figures by listing the cities with the highest suicide rates and what manner of adult was most likely to indulge (divorced men were the most likely to throw-in the proverbial towel).

1932's grand prize winner was Davenport, Iowa; the city with the least suicides was Troy, New York.
No explanations were made that could explain why Western locales were more desperate than Eastern.

CLICK HERE to read additional primary source articles about the Great Depression...

     


The Increased Suicide Rate (Literary Digest, 1933)

The Increased Suicide Rate (Literary Digest, 1933)

Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2008 Old Magazine Articles