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"Some enemy cities were too disease-ridden and filthy for immediate occupation. Navy doctors revealed that dysentery, typhoid fever, typhus, diphtheria and tuberculosis ran unchecked in two towns. In another area, 40 percent of the Japanese men examined suffered from trachoma. Despite these problems, the occupation moved ahead smoothly. If the Japs continued to cooperate, said Lt. General Robert L. Eichelberger, Eighth Army commander, the occupation force might be home in a year."

     


The Work Begins (Newsweek Magazine, 1945)

The Work Begins (Newsweek Magazine, 1945)

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