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"'Having broken through the German lines [at Cambrai], I would have sent my cavalry and mounted machine-gun batteries through the gap into the open country beyond to be used in pursuit and cutting railways and communications and would have poured masses of infantry and machine gun batteries through to the German rear and started a great turning movement...' As he unfolded his great plan, Napoleon rose from his chair, and paced across the room. He talked with an energy that made each word a bursting shell, while he punctuated his discourse with dynamic gestures and his eyes snapped fire."

- so saith the "Napoleon" of Walter Noble Burns (1872 1932) in this engrossing piece of historical fiction.




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Napoleon Takes Charge (Literary Digest, 1922)

Napoleon Takes Charge (Literary Digest, 1922)

Napoleon Takes Charge (Literary Digest, 1922)

Napoleon Takes Charge (Literary Digest, 1922)

Napoleon Takes Charge (Literary Digest, 1922)

Napoleon Takes Charge (Literary Digest, 1922)

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