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Click here to read about the sack of Richmond.
Click here to read about the Confederate conscription laws.




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In three paragraphs this essay clearly outlines why the "Grand Old Men" of the Confederacy selected Richmond, Virginia to serve as the seat of their doomed plutocracy. Recognizing that the city was a mere 110 miles from the White House, it seemed like an odd choice, yet

"Second only to New Orleans, Richmond was the largest city in the Confederacy, having a population of about 38,000. It was also the center of iron manufacturing in the South. The Tredegar Iron Works, main source of cannon supply for the Southern armies, influenced the choice of Richmond as the Confederate Capital and demanded defense."

Click here to read about General Grant's march on Richmond.

Click here to read about the heavy influence religion had in the Rebel states during the American Civil War.

From Amazon:

     


Richmond Selected as the Capital of the Confederacy (National Park Service, 1961)

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