Vanity Fair Magazine Articles
The Atlantic Monthly Articles
The Outlook Articles
People Today Articles
American Legion Monthly Articles
Sea Power Magazine Articles
Confederate Veteran Magazine Articles
flapper magazine Articles
La Baionnette Articles
PIC Magazine Articles
Outing Magazine Articles
Stage Magazine Articles
Life Magazine  Articles
National Park Service Histories Articles
Punch Magazine Articles
Men's Wear Articles
Current Literature Articles
The New York Times Articles
Hearst's Sunday American Articles
Click Magazine Articles
Creative Art Magazine Articles
Rob Wagner's Script Articles
The New Republic Articles
American Legion Weekly Articles
The Smart Set Articles
Photoplay Magazine Articles
Leslie's Magazine Articles
Ken Magazine Articles
PM  Articles
Saturday Review of Literature Articles
The Dial Magazine Articles
Theatre Arts Magazine Articles
The North American Review Articles
Direction Magazine Articles
'47 Magazine Articles
Film Spectator Articles
Film Daily Articles
Trench Warfare History Articles

 




Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

This W.W. I article was written by David Le Roy Ferguson, an African-American pastor assigned to minister to a flock of black Doughboys posted to the supply depot at St. Nazaire, France. These men were stevedores who were ordered to perform the thankless task of off-loading cargo from the various supply ships arriving daily to support the A.E.F.. Aside from working as cooks or in other service positions, this was a customary assignment given to the African-Americans during the war; only a small percentage were posted to the 92nd and 93rd combat divisions.

Pastor Ferguson's magazine article salutes the necessary labor of these men while at the same time adhering to the usual simple descriptions of the African-American as cheerful, musical and rather crude.

Read about racism in the U.S. Army of W.W. I

Click here to read about the African-American efforts during the First World War.

Click here to read a history of African-Americans between the years 1619 through 1939.

     


- from Amazon:


African-American Stevedores in the U.S. Army (The Independent, 1919)

African-American Stevedores in the U.S. Army (The Independent, 1919)

African-American Stevedores in the U.S. Army (The Independent, 1919)

Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2008 Old Magazine Articles