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Attached is a photograph of the King Tiger tank, accompanied by some vital statistics and assorted observations that were recorded by the U.S. Department of War and printed in one of their manuals in March of 1945:

"The King Tiger is a tank designed essentially for defensive warfare or for breaking through strong lines of defense. It is unsuitable for rapid maneuver and highly mobile warfare because of its great weight and and low speed...The King Tiger virtually is invulnerable to frontal attack, but the flanks, which are less well protected, can be penetrated by Allied antitank weapons at most normal combat ranges.

The American answer to the Tiger was the M26 Pershing Tank; read about it here.

Click here to read about the Patton Tank in the Korean War...

Click here to read more articles about W.W. II weapons and inventions.

     


The  King Tiger Tank  (U.S. Dept. of War, 1945)

The  King Tiger Tank  (U.S. Dept. of War, 1945)

The  King Tiger Tank  (U.S. Dept. of War, 1945)

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