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When the young women of France were asked the question:

"Who would you choose for a husband, a Frenchman or an American? And what are the qualities and faults which justify your preference?"

-some of the answers were pretty funny (especially the responses made by the irate Frenchmen returning from the Great War). After all the votes were tallied, it was discovered that, regardless of their "gold teeth", "big tortoise shell glasses" and shaved faces, the Doughboys were able to charm as much as a quarter of the women asked (which was a good deal better than they thought they would do) Some women, however, were not very impressed.

Click here if would like to read about British Women and American G.I.s during the Second World War...

Click here to read an article about social diseases within the A.E.F.

     



French Women and American Soldiers   (The Spiker, 1919)

French Women and American Soldiers   (The Spiker, 1919)

French Women and American Soldiers   (The Spiker, 1919)

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