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Regardless of the fact that the anonymous fellow who penned the attached column acknowledged the 1919 massacre at Amritsar was an event that sprung entirely from the infertile cranium of a British military man, he nonetheless was of the mind that seemed to believe that the British Empire could do no wrong in India.
The impression that he wished to impart concerning Gandhi was a total distortion of the man and his beliefs. Gandhi frowned upon the young for enthusing over Dictaphones and other 1920s inventions yet in this article he is depicted as an unattached "monk" who despised all contemporary innovations. To be sure, Gandhi believed that colonial rule was terribly repressive, but he was not so anti-British that he could not sing the praises of English law from time to time, which he did - and no mention is made whatever as to the fact that just three years earlier the man was involved in recruiting troops for the British Army. At the conclusion of the article ominous quotes appear stating that Gandhi was considering an armed rebellion as a possible course of action.

     


Slandering  Gandhi  (The Literary Digest, 1921)

Slandering  Gandhi  (The Literary Digest, 1921)

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