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THE NEW YORK TIMES war correspondent Arthur Ruhl (1876-1935) reviewed a book that would later be seen as a classic piece of World War I fiction: Company K by William March (born William Edward Campbell 1893 – 1954). Awarded both the French Croix de Guerre and the Distinguished Service Cross, March gained an understanding of war and the frailties of human character as a member of the Fifth Marines fighting at Belleau Wood and participating in the big push during the San-Mihiel Offensive:

"The outstanding virtues of William March's work are those of complete absence of sentimentality and routine romanticism, of a dramatic gift constantly heightened and sharpened by eloquence of understatement."

CLICK HERE... to read one man's account of his struggle with shell shock...

From Amazon: Company K

     



''Company K'' by William March (Saturday Review of Literature, 1933)

''Company K'' by William March (Saturday Review of Literature, 1933)

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