Vanity Fair Magazine Articles
The Atlantic Monthly Articles
The Outlook Articles
People Today Articles
American Legion Monthly Articles
Sea Power Magazine Articles
Confederate Veteran Magazine Articles
flapper magazine Articles
La Baionnette Articles
PIC Magazine Articles
Outing Magazine Articles
Stage Magazine Articles
Life Magazine  Articles
National Park Service Histories Articles
Punch Magazine Articles
Men's Wear Articles
Current Literature Articles
The New York Times Articles
Hearst's Sunday American Articles
Click Magazine Articles
Creative Art Magazine Articles
Rob Wagner's Script Articles
The New Republic Articles
American Legion Weekly Articles
The Smart Set Articles
Photoplay Magazine Articles
Leslie's Magazine Articles
Ken Magazine Articles
PM  Articles
Saturday Review of Literature Articles
The Dial Magazine Articles
Theatre Arts Magazine Articles
The North American Review Articles
Direction Magazine Articles
'47 Magazine Articles
Film Spectator Articles
Film Daily Articles
Trench Warfare History Articles

 




Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

Shortly before the attached article was seen on the newsstands, America had probably read nothing about the Assault Climbers of the U.S. Army - but a few week later, when D-Day was launched, the news-hungry readers on the home front would feel that they couldn't read enough about those hardy lads who climbed the steep cliffs at Point du Hoc on June 6. But in May of 1944, the term "assault climbers" was new to them.

This article is beautifully illustrated with two color images and a brief explanation as to what was involved in the training of those lucky souls in the U.S. infantry who were charged with the task of learning how to climb the steep, rocky terrain held by the Fascist powers.

"An assault climber is a soldier who is (1) a mountain guide, and (2) a fighting man. He must know how to attack by going up steep mountains swiftly and quietly that no telltale rocks go crashing down to spread an alarm to the enemy....In small groups, assault climbers are schooled in every phase of mountaineering; from properly walking, to correctly falling. They must to stand erect in climbing and descending. In twos and threes they help each other. They learn to lead an attacking party, using ropes clinched around rocks, trees or their own braced bodies..."

Five years after the war, many infantry training camps had to reopen...

Which Hollywood actors received draft deferments?

Read what the U.S. Army psychologists had to say about courage in war.

     



ExactSeek: Relevant Web Search

''Assault Climbing'' (Click Magazine, 1944)

''Assault Climbing'' (Click Magazine, 1944)

''Assault Climbing'' (Click Magazine, 1944)

Article Surfer
<— Prev    |    Next —>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2008 Old Magazine Articles