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Roving journalist George E. Sokolsky (1893 - 1962) filed this column from the American hinterlands in an effort to reveal what the average American thought of the New Deal after its first eleven months in office:

"The most universal complaint is that the NRA is squeezing the middleman and the white collar man, that is, the average American in the average city, out of existence. The grocer, the butcher, the barber, the stenographer, the school teacher, the kind of people that the neighbors know and like, have not been benefited by the NRA; they are much worse off because prices have gone up and their compensations are stationary... In the Middle-West, and the South, they favor inflation because that will free them from their New York creditors. In the silver states, they want as much done for silver as was done for cotton. In California, they seek relief for the citrus industry. They resent the government's attempt to run their business although they would welcome anything the government might do to make them prosperous. They desire prosperity but not government management."

     


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The Unhappy Constituents (New Outlook Magazine, 1933)

The Unhappy Constituents (New Outlook Magazine, 1933)

The Unhappy Constituents (New Outlook Magazine, 1933)

The Unhappy Constituents (New Outlook Magazine, 1933)

The Unhappy Constituents (New Outlook Magazine, 1933)

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