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Appearing in the May 6, 1933 issue of The Literary Digest was the attached two page article that reported on the much anticipated World Economic Conference [so-called: history remembers it as the London Economic Conference] which was scheduled to convene the following month in London.

The leaders who agreed to assemble were all of one mind in so much as their shared belief that collectively they would stand a better chance in defeating the economic depression that was bedeviling all their respective countries. It was their intention to meet and review all existing international trade and tariff agreements and to make an effort at stabilizing the currency exchange rates.

The whole affair was doomed by July when it became clear that the representatives from the United States rejected many of the plans to stabilize the currency.

The above Miguel Covarubius illustration, created to mock the conference, is titled The Wailing Wall of Gold.

Yet, regardless of the degradation of the Great Depression, the United States was still an enormously wealthy nation...

CLICK HERE to read additional primary source articles about the Great Depression...

Read an article about the 1935 dollar ...

During the later years of the Great Depression a new hat was a seemingly unattainable fashion item and so many women began wearing element in lieu of a hat - click here to find out...

     


The Economic Collapse of the World (Literary Digest, 1933)

The Economic Collapse of the World (Literary Digest, 1933)

The Economic Collapse of the World (Literary Digest, 1933)

The Economic Collapse of the World (Literary Digest, 1933)

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