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Robert E. Lee

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"The enemy was driven through Gettysburg with heavy loss, including about 5,000 prisoners and several pieces of artillery. He retired to a high range of his hills south and east of the town. The attack was not pressed that afternoon, the enemy's force being unknown, and it being considered advisable to await the arrival of of the rest of our troops."

"It had not been intended to fight a general battle at such a distance from our base, unless attacked by the enemy, but, finding ourselves unexpectedly by the Federal Army, it became a matter of difficulty to withdraw through the mountains with our large trains... Encouraged by the successful issue of the engagement of the first day, and in view of the valuable result that would ensue from the defeat of the army of General Mead, it was thought advisable to renew the attack. "

     


Lee's Report Regarding the First Day (W.C. Storck, 1951)

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