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As the photo of downtown Los Angeles posted on the right indicates, there was a tiny Nazi presence in that city during the late Thirties, and this was beautifully explained by Steven J. Ross in his book Hitler in Los Angeles (2017). There were a number of anti-nazi organizations in LA to counter the Fascists, among them was the Hollywood Anti-Nazi League, which was composed of Hollywood actors, writers and producers -

"Its program: to fight Naziism and its counterpart Fascism in the United States and to publicize and expose all manifestations of these isms as they can assert themselves locally and nationally."

The League had sent as many 14 ambulances to aid in the fight against Generalissimo Franco. A year prior to the printing of this article, this group had done a terrific job hounding Vittorio Mussolini (son of the Italian dictator) from Hollywood and a few weeks after this article appeared, they would do the same thing to the Nazi film director, Leni Riefenstahl.

The League was a communist front, established in 1936 by a Stalinist agent named Otto Katz (1895 - 1952). It was dissolved in 1939 when the Hitler-Stalin non-aggression pact was signed.

     


The Hollywood Anti-Nazi League (Click Magazine, 1938)

The Hollywood Anti-Nazi League (Click Magazine, 1938)

The Hollywood Anti-Nazi League (Click Magazine, 1938)

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