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By the early Spring of 1941 Adolf Hitler was being compared to Napoleon in practically every European newspaper and magazine, for it had not been since the earliest days of the Nineteenth Century that so many European armies had been out-maneuvered in such a brief span of time - and no one believed the Napoleon comparisons more than he did. Hitler was simply inebriated with power and there seemed to be no limit as to what he with all his military might was capable of achieving.

H.R. Knickerbocker (1898 1949), the far-flung correspondent for Hearst who had been closely watching Hitler since 1923 pointed out that on April 29, 1941 the Axis forces had printed (what he liked to call) a "trial balloon" on the pages of the Japan Times Advertiser that clearly indicated the peace terms that were acceptable to der Fuhrer.

Knickerbocker provided an outline of the proposal as well as commentary in his 1942 bestseller, Is Tomorrow Hitler's?

"It is not a negotiated peace, it is a dictated peace...The Axis statement begins with the declaration that the day of small or weak nations is over, and no nation which cannot stand on its own feet may be permitted to exist... The nations called upon to settle world peace would be Germany, with Italy as a junior partner, Japan, the British Empire and the United States."

"Since the British government ignored it and the British and American press derided it, Germany dropped the idea for the moment, but you may be sure it has not dropped it for good. Seven weeks after its publication Hitler sent his armies into Russia."

From Amazon:

     


What Hitler Wanted (Omnibooks Magazine, 1942)

What Hitler Wanted (Omnibooks Magazine, 1942)

What Hitler Wanted (Omnibooks Magazine, 1942)

What Hitler Wanted (Omnibooks Magazine, 1942)

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