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Shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, L.A. Times correspondent Tom Treanor (1914 1944) was quoted in the February, 1942 issue of British Vogue explaining how the citizens of Southern California dealt with the news:

"We rolled with the sneak punch in California. But we're earthquake country, not to be knocked off our feet by a piece of Japanese treachery. When the news came we responded in our normal way to crises. We jumped in our automobiles and drove energetically somewhere, anywhere. We clogged the highways and burned up gasoline."

Treanor was billed by writer Damon Runyon as "one of the four best reporters developed in this war." The attached profile was printed shortly before his death in 1944, he was killed on on June tenth in Normandy.

Click here to read additional articles about the
war correspondents of the Second World War.

     


Tom Treanor of the L.A. Times (Coronet Magazine, 1944)

Tom Treanor of the L.A. Times (Coronet Magazine, 1944)

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