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The article attached here was pulled from the pages of a 1919 NEW YORK TIMES that reported on the history of Negro infantry units of the World War I (the first three pages were devoted to the French Colonial troops - and you may click here to read an article about about them). It concerned the combat record of the American 92nd and 93rd Divisions - units that were dubbed 'Schwartz Teufel' (black devils) by the luckless Germans who stood in the opposite trenches.

"The negro soldiers of the United States arrived late on the field of battle, but in more than sufficient time to make Germany feel the strength of their arm. In all 83,000 Negroes were drafted for service in the National Army sent overseas. More than 626 of the 1,250 colored men who completed their course of training were commissioned as officers in the United States Army; nearly 100 negro physicians and surgeons received commissions as officers in the Medical Reserve Corps and a full 30,000 men constituted the 92nd Division detailed for duty in France under General Pershing. The total number of Negro combat troops was 42,000".

Click here additional articles about the American Blacks who fought in the First World War...

     


American Blacks Under French Command (New York Times, 1919)

American Blacks Under French Command (New York Times, 1919)

American Blacks Under French Command (New York Times, 1919)

American Blacks Under French Command (New York Times, 1919)

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