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During the course of the war in the Pacific, there were as many as twelve Japanese female radio commentators broadcasting assorted varieties of demoralizing radio programming to the Allied forces. However the Americans knew nothing of this collective and simply assumed that all the broadcasts were hosted by one woman, who they dubbed, "Tokyo Rose". The story told in this article begins in the late summer of 1945 when:

"...one of the supreme objectives of American correspondents landing in Japan was Radio Tokyo. There they hoped to find someone to pass off as the one-and-only "Rose" and scoop their colleagues. When the information had been sifted a little, a girl named Iva Toguri (Iva Toguri D'Aquino: 1916 2006), emerged as the only candidate who came close to filling the bill. For three years she had played records, interspersed with snappy comments, beamed to Allied soldiers on the "Zero Hour"...Her own name for herself was "Orphan Ann."

Toguri's story was an interesting one that went on for many years and finally resulted in a 1977 pardon granted by one who had listened to many such broadcasts: President Gerald R. Ford (1913-2006), who had served in the Pacific on board the aircraft carrier "USS Monterey" (CVL-26).

Click here to read more articles about American traitors of the Second World War.

Read about the American reporter who became a Nazi...

CLICK HERE to read about the beautiful "Blonde Battalions" who spied for the Nazis...

       *Watch a Cartoon Clip Lampooning Tokyo Rose*


- from Amazon:


Iva Toguri of California (Yank Magazine, 1945)

Iva Toguri of California (Yank Magazine, 1945)

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