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General Maxime Weygand (1867 – 1965) is remembered as the French military commander who allowed himself to be out-maneuvered and out-generaled when France was invaded by the German Army in May of 1940. The Battle for France lasted roughly 42 days before Weygrand's forces collapsed.

Between the years 1935 and 1937, General Weygrand was a member of an anti-communist, pro-fascist organization called La Comité secret d'action révolutionnaire, nicknamed La Cagoule ("the Cowl"). The Cagoulard movement was a violent one and it was established in order to overthrow the French Third Republic; it existed with the blessings of "the Hero of Verdun", Marshall Philippe Petain. By 1937 the conspiracy was broken up by the police; many of the conspirators were prosecuted, but due to his prestige within the military, Weygrand was spared - even though it was clear to anyone who had eyes that Weygrand had Fascist leanings:

"Democracies can no longer wage war against authoritarian states. Before we can undertake anything, we must first drive out the parliament."

More primary source articles about W.W. II France can be read here...

Another article about a French general who collaborated with the Nazis can be read here...

- from Amazon:

     


The General Who Failed France (Coronet Magazine, 1941)

The General Who Failed France (Coronet Magazine, 1941)

The General Who Failed France (Coronet Magazine, 1941)

The General Who Failed France (Coronet Magazine, 1941)

The General Who Failed France (Coronet Magazine, 1941)

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