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''A Flapper's Appeal to Parents'' (The Outlook, 1922)

"If one judges by appearances, I suppose I am a flapper. I am within the age limit, I wear bobbed hair, the badge of flapperhood. I powder my nose. I wear fringed skirts and bright colored sweaters, and scarves and waists with Peter Pan collars and low-heeled 'finale hopper' shoes. I adore to dance... But then there are many degrees of a flapper. There is the semi-flapper, the flapper, the super-flapper. Each of these three main general divisions has its degrees of variation. I might possibly be placed somewhere in the middle of the first class".

The Undeveloped Weapons of the Nazi Scientists (Yank Magazine, 1945)

The war was over when the U.S. Army Ordnance Department began snooping around all the assorted άBER-secret weapons labs and work shops where the pointiest headed Nazis were developing some truly far-seeing weaponry, inventions that they were never able to perfect (thankfully).

One of the most striking aspects of the attached article is the part when you recognize that it was the Nazi scientists who first conceived of such space-based weaponry as the "Star Wars" technology that was ushered in during the Reagan presidency (i.e.: the "Strategic Defense Initiative"). While in pursuit of their nefarious tasks, these same scientists also conceived of harnessing the powers of the sun in order to advance Hitler's queer vision of the perfect world.

Click here to read about the firm belief held by the German Army concerning the use of motorcycles in modern war.

Ode to Feminine Knees (Flapper Magazine, 1922)

When the skirt hems began to rise in the Twenties, it was widely understood that the vision of a woman's leg was a rare treat for both man and boy; a spectacle that had not been enjoyed since the days of Adam (married men excluded). The flappers certainly knew this, and they generally believed that suffering the dizzying enthusiasm of the male of the species was a small price to pay in order to secure some element of liberty. The flappers liked their hem-lengths just where they were and, thank you very much, they were not about to drop them.

Attached are some verses by an anonymous flapper who expressed her reaction regarding all that undeserved male attention her knees were generating.

Why France Fell (Omnibooks Magazine, 1942)

On assignment for the Hearst papers, H.R. Knickerbocker (1898 – 1949) witnessed the total collapse of the French Army. He made his observations and conclusions available to American readers in his 1941 book Is Tomorrow Hitler's, which hit the bookshops shortly after Pearl Harbor.

"[The French Army] did not possess anything like the number of tanks and airplanes used by the Germans; but I would rank this deficiency at the bottom of any list of causes of the French defeat. If they had ignored their low birth rate, been willing to spend lives, had retained the old offensive spirit traditional in the French Army, had known that they had to win or perish, had a Churchill to inspire and lead them, and had no traitors in their ranks, their comparative lack of weapons would not have mattered; they would still be fighting the Germans in France. The inferiority of their equipment consisted in the lack of a sufficient number of planes and tanks, but if they had had the spirit to win they could have held the Germans until the deficiency could be made up."

Click here to read the observations of U.S. Army Lieutenant Louis L'Amour concerning 1946 Paris.

Nazi Art Plunder (Click Magazine, 1943)

The attached article tells the story of an organization that was formed by the German Foreign Office in order to steal the treasures of the occupied European nations. It was called the Nazi Art Corps and it was divided into four battalions of SS men; they stole manuscripts, sculpture, paintings, jewels etc, etc, etc. They answered to the Reich Minister of Foreign Affairs, Joachim von Ribbentrop (1893 – 1946).

French Soldiers Desperate to Leave the Trenches (The Atlanta Georgian, 1917)

So horrid was the terror of World War I trench warfare that more than a few of the Frenchmen serving in those forward positions (and others who were simply overcome with life in the military) began to post personal ads in French newspapers, volunteering to marry widows and divorcees with large families in order to be absolved of all military duty.

Read what the U.S. Army psychologists had to say about courage.

''Cupid to Seal the Balkan Peace'' (Vanity Fair, 1913)

By the time this item appeared in print, the Balkan War (1912-1913), was over however some of the swells of Europe put their crowned heads together and collectively came up with the best Medeival plan they could think of in order to insure the promise of peace. The plan was to have:

• the Czar's daughter, Grand Duchess Olga (1895 - 1918), would wed Serbia's Crown Prince Alexander

• the Czar's second daughter, Grand Duchess Tatiana (1897 - 1918), was promised to Rumania's Crown Prince Charles (1893 - 1959)

• All concerned agreed that Rumania's Pricess Elizabeth (1894 - 1956) and Crown Prince George of Greece (1890 - 1947) would make a simply splendid couple (they divorced in 1935).

President Wilson's War Cabinet Convenes (Review of Reviews, 1922)

Franklin Knight Lane (1864 – 1921) recalled his service as President Wilson's Secretary of the Interior and the eventful year of 1917 when Wilson lead the U.S. into it's first European war. Some may be amused as he reminiscences about the time Army Chief of Staff General Tasker H. Bliss (1853 - 1930) fell asleep during one of the cabinet meeting.

Women Drivers Vindicated (Literary Digest, 1936)

Attached is a magazine article concerning the on-going debate regarding women drivers and the continuing balderdash as to which of the genders is the better driver: the issue was decided in 1936 and the men lost:

"...according to the report of a university professor who took the trouble to find out. Armed with statistics, he asserts that the female of the motoring species is not nearly so deadly as the male."

50,000 Klansmen March in Washington, D.C. (Literary Digest, 1925)

A report on the August, 1925 KKK march in Washington, D.C.:
"The parade itself marshaled 'from 50,000 to 60,000 white-robed men and women' as the correspondent of the The New York 'Times' estimates, and H.L. Mencken tells us in the New York 'Sun'":

"The Klan put it all over its enemies. The parade was grander and gaudier, by far than anything the wizards had prophesied. It was longer, it was thicker, it was higher in tone. I stood in front of the treasury for two hours watching the legions pass. They marched in lines of eighteen or twenty, solidly shoulder to shoulder. I retired for refreshment and was gone an hour. When I got back Pennsylvania Avenue was still a mass of white from the Treasury down to the foot of Capitol Hill - a full mile of Klansmen..."

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